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Department of Geosciences
Florida Atlantic University
777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431
Phone: 561-297-3250
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About the Program and Industry

The Department of Geosciences at Florida Atlantic University is housed on the Boca Raton campus and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in various subfields of the geosciences. The three main areas of focus in the department are earth systems sciencehuman-environmental systems and geo-information science.

We are proud of the research specialties that we have developed in hydrogeology, paleontology and paleo-environments, human-environmental modeling, and urban and regional development. The Department places a strong emphasis on fieldwork, GIS, remote sensing and other analytical techniques in geospatial modeling, and encourages interdisciplinary research.

Highlights

Earth

NEW: Online Programs

MS in Geosciences, BA in Geosciences, BS in Geosciences and GIS Certificate  Learn More

Geosciences now offers  online M.S. in Geosciences, B.S. in Geosciences with a Geography focus and B.A. in Geosciences with a Geography focus degrees that will give students an understanding of not only where phenomena are located upon the Earth’s surface, but how they came to be there. Geographic Information Sciences (GIS) is emphasized to analyze these spatial relationships.  

Also available to all students are fully online GIS Certificates. 

Faculty and Student Research

Associate Professor, Dr. Scott Markwith’s helps save wild animals

Top Award

Associate Professor, Dr. Scott Markwith’s research is helping save wild animals from the dangers of busy highways. His research on roadways throughout Florida showed container screens are solutions for highways with the transit of wild animals in areas such as Brazil. Read more here

The New York Times discusses the research in an article with Dr. Markwith’s colleague, Dr. Julio Cesar de Souza. Read more here

Matt McClellan: A Better Way to Probe Peat

Student Research

Ph.D. Student Matt McCllan employs a technology called ground-penetrating radar (GPR), which uses high-frequency radar pulses to quickly and noninvasively create below-the-surface images. Matt and his team led by Dr. Xavier Comas used GPR to determine the volume of peat in several depressional wetlands in the Disney Wilderness Preserve in Florida.   https://doi.org/10.1029/2018EO089929